Pronóstico del viento y generación eólica

Estudio aplicado al parque eólico experimental de Sotavento Galicia La variabilidad de la generación eólica debido a la fluctuación en la velocidad del viento complica su integración a la red eléctrica. Esta variabilidad puede incrementar su coste, al requerir generación de apoyo de otro tipo (Hirth 2013). Un pronóstico impreciso de esta variabilidad puede ocasionar costes elevados al generador, al tener que compensar los desvíos entre la energía prevista y la realmente producida. Por lo tanto, un aumento en la precisión de los pronósticos de viento supone un ahorro económico considerable tanto para el productor como para el consumidor. Para estudiar la posibilidad de mejorar los pronósticos de viento existente hemos aplicado el modelo atmosférico WRF a alta resolución a la estación experimental de Sotavento, en Galicia, de esa forma se pueden comparar los valores simulados por el modelo y los valores medidos hechos públicos por la estación experimental. A continuación, se explica brevemente el uso y aplicación de este modelo, su...
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Hands on Solar Radiation

We'll have a quick look at some of the functions in the R package insol. Here we will learn to calculate shadows and illumination intensity and to compute insolation on solar panels, windows or complex terrain. There is a basic description of the background processes which involve vector algebra. It helps to understand how it works, but it is not needed for practical applications. Background R insol follows the algorithms developed in Corripio (2003), which treat the sun and every grid cell as a vector. A usual terrain representation is a Digital Elevation Model (DEM), that is a matrix of terrain elevation (Z) at given regular spacing in the X (eastings) and Y (northings) direction. Because most modern computer languages are very efficient at dealing with matrices, these solar algorithms are quite fast. We define the sun vector as a unit vector pointing towards the sun in a reference system fixed on the observer, as in the figure below. Direction of the axes...
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Weather forecasts, the importance of model resolution

When working in extreme environments having advance knowledge of the weather conditions can be the difference between a successful operation or a waste of time and resources with considerable personnel risk. Whether it is a mountain survey, fieldwork, an environmental assessment or a mining operation, lacking a good forecast can be an extremely risky business. Weather forecasts are not perfect, but they have become impressively accurate in recent years. However there is an oversupply of information in this field, with little quality controls in most cases. If your work is affected by weather and you work at high altitude or in a tough environment, there is one key aspect of the weather information to consider: the resolution of the models. There are quality global data coming from models such as the GFS or ECMWF, but it is necessary to know their limitations, as they are not applicable everywhere, every time. Because these models are global, there is an intrinsic limitation to their...
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